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Seeking Starlink

The hubbub about SpaceX's Starlink satellite constellation

It’s all anyone in the space industry can talk about right now and with good reason. Starting later this year, SpaceX plans to provide low-latency internet service from low Earth orbit to people around the globe, even those in the most remote areas. To achieve such a lofty goal, Elon Musk’s space company is scheduled to launch dozens of Starlink satellites every couple of weeks. These launches create quite the viewing phenomenon in space.

SpaceX Starlink satellites captured by astronomer Dr. Marco Langbroek in the Netherlands on May 24, 2019, shortly after launch.

 

To catch a glimpse of this unusual space train, you’ll have to know when and where to look. That’s where CelesTrak comes in.

Dr. T.S. Kelso, the operator of CelesTrak and a senior research astrodynamicist at AGI, has been providing free satellite positional information online for 35 years. Through CelesTrak, he is making sure that satellite data is not only readily available but also current and accurate.

Bring Starlink down to your smartphone or tablet

Using data from SpaceX, CelesTrak’s orbit visualization tool enables you to track the famous Starlink satellites in a web browser or on a mobile device. And with the same data, you can calculate Starlink viewing times with Systems Tool Kit (STK).

See Starlink fly over your home

Wherever you may be in the world, you can easily determine the list of Starlink passes above your head. Find the perfect time, culmination elevation, and clear sky with CelesTrak’s pass visualization tool. Be sure to snap a photo!

Happy satellite hunting!

Author

Maggie Handler


COMSPOC

Track satellites and space debris with high precision to protect your valuable space assets.